Tyne Rivers Trust > Project > Tackling invasive species

Tackling the spread of non-native plants!

Like many rivers, the Tyne and its tributaries have been colonised by non-native plant species. In some cases they have arrived here accidentally and in other cases have been brought here as a garden plant and then escaped into the wild.

Often these plants have spread rapidly and formed dense patches, this alters the composition of plant species on river banks and reduces the amount of habitat available for native species. The Tyne is affected by three species in particular: Japanese knotweed, Himalayan balsam and giant hogweed.

 

Himalayan balsam

It was originally introduced as a garden plant and grows densely on riverbanks. It out-competes native species, erodes river banks and can hinder flow in times of high rainfall.

It’s easy to pull out so we work with volunteers to clear huge patches. We start at the top of the catchment and work our way further downstream each year.

 

 

Japanese Knotweed

It was originally introduced as an ornamental plant and grows in dense thickets. It out-competes native species, erodes river banks and can hinder flow in times of high rainfall.

We spray or stem inject the plant to control it.

 

 

 

 

 

Giant hogweed

This Russian plant can grow up to 3m in height.Contact with any part of this plant must be avoided as even the smallest amount of sap can cause blistering to your skin. It out-competes native species, erodes river banks and can hinder flow in times of high rainfall.

It is removed by digging it out or a chemical spray.

 

 

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